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Years in comics
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19th Century
1900s
1900 · 1901 · 1902 · 1903 · 1904
1905 · 1906 · 1907 · 1908 · 1909
1910s
1910 · 1911 · 1912 · 1913 · 1914
1915 · 1916 · 1917 · 1918 · 1919
1920s
1920 · 1921 · 1922 · 1923 · 1924
1925 · 1926 · 1927 · 1928 · 1929
1930s
1930 · 1931 · 1932 · 1933 · 1934
1935 · 1936 · 1937 · 1938 · 1939
1940s
1940 · 1941 · 1942 · 1943 · 1944
1945 · 1946 · 1947 · 1948 · 1949
1950s
1950 · 1951 · 1952 · 1953 · 1954
1955 · 1956 · 1957 · 1958 · 1959
1960s
1960 · 1961 · 1962 · 1963 · 1964
1965 · 1966 · 1967 · 1968 · 1969
1970s
1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974
1975 · 1976 · 1977 · 1978 · 1979
1980s
1980 · 1981 · 1982 · 1983 · 1984
1985 · 1986 · 1987 · 1988 · 1989
1990s
1990 · 1991 · 1992 · 1993 · 1994
1995 · 1996 · 1997 · 1998 · 1999
2000s
2000 · 2001 · 2002 · 2003 · 2004
2005 · 2006 · 2007 · 2008 · 2009
2010s
2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014
2015 · 2016 · 2017 · 2018 · 2019

See also: 1930s in comics, other events of the 1940s, 1950s in comics and the list of years in comics


Publications: 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 - 1946 - 1947 - 1948 - 1949

EventsEdit

1940Edit

The Justice Society of America, the first superhero team in comic book history first appear in All Star Comics #3. The team is conceived by editor Sheldon Mayer and writer Gardner Fox.

Captain America, created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, first appears in Captain America Comics #1, published by Timely Comics. Appearing a year before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the cover shows Captain America punching Nazi leader Adolf Hitler in the jaw. The comic sold nearly one million copies.

The Spirit, created by writer-artist Will Eisner, first appears in a Sunday-newspaper comic book insert. The seven-page weekly series is considered one of the comic-art medium's most significant works, with Eisner creating or popularizing many of the styles, techniques, and storytelling conventions used by comics professionals decades later.

1941Edit

Wonder Woman, created by William Moulton Marston, first appears in All Star Comics #8. She is among the first and most famous comic book superheroines.

Stan Lee becomes editor-in-chief at Timely Comics.

Adventures of Captain Marvel, a twelve-chapter film serial adapted from the popular Captain Marvel comic book character for Republic Pictures, debuts. It was the first film adaptation of a comic book superhero.[1]

Archie Andrews, created by Bob Montana first appears in Pep Comics #22, published by MLJ Magazines.

Plastic Man, created by writer-artist Jack Cole, first appears in Police Comics #1, published by Quality Comics.

1942Edit

Crime Does Not Pay debuts, edited and mostly written by Charles Biro and published by Lev Gleason Publications. It was the first "true crime" comic series and also the first comic in the crime comics genre. One of the most popular comics of its day, at its height the comic would claim a readership of six million on its covers.

1943Edit

1944Edit

Charlton Comics, an American comic book publisher, publishes its first title, Yellowjacket, an anthology of superhero and horror stories, under the imprint Frank Comunale Publications. The company would begin publishing under the Charlton name in 1946.

Superboy, the adventures of Superman as a boy, first appears in More Fun Comics #101. The character is currently the subject of a legal battle between Time Warner, the owner of DC Comics, and the estate of Jerry Siegel. The Siegel estate claims that the original "Superboy" character published by DC Comics is an independent creation that used ideas from Jerry Siegel's original rejected pitch and was created without his consent.[2]

1945Edit

1946Edit

The All-Winners Squad, the first superhero team in the Marvel Universe, first appears in All Winners Comics #19, published by Timely Comics.

Sazae-san, by Machiko Hasegawa debuts in Fukunichi Shimbun.

1947Edit

Li'l Folks, the first comic strip by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, debuts mainly in Schulz's hometown paper, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, on June 22nd. Li'l Folks can almost be regarded as an embryonic version of Peanuts, containing characters and themes which were to reappear in the later strip: a well-dressed young man with a fondness for Beethoven a la Schroeder, a dog with a striking resemblance to Snoopy, and even a boy named Charlie Brown.

1948Edit

The Association of Comics Magazine Publishers (ACMP) forms on July 1, 1948 to regulate the content of comic books in the face of increasing public criticism. Founding members included publishers Leverett Gleason of Lev Gleason Publications, Bill Gaines of EC Comics, Harold Moore (publisher of Famous Funnies) and Rae Herman of Orbit Publications. Henry Schultz served as executive director.

1949Edit

PublicationsEdit

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1940Edit

See also: 1940 in comics

1941Edit

See also: 1941 in comics

1942Edit

See also: 1942 in comics

1943Edit

See also: 1943 in comics

1944Edit

See also: 1944 in comics

1945Edit

See also: 1945 in comics

1946Edit

See also: 1946 in comics

1947Edit

See also: 1947 in comics

1948Edit

See also: 1948 in comics

1949Edit

See also: 1949 in comics

ReferencesEdit

  1. See: Superhero films
  2. Newsarama: THE BATTLE FOR THE BOY
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